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Clay Electric Cooperative’s board of trustees declared a record $12 million Capital Credits refund for members who received service from 1988 through 2016. Capital Credits... Continue Reading ›

If you cannot attend our Annual Meeting next month, you can still vote in the co-op's trustee elections! There are three trustee candidates up for re-election this year. To... Continue Reading ›

Co-op members gathered at three trustee district meetings in late January-early February to select candidates for the co-op’s board of trustees in Districts 3, 5 and 7.... Continue Reading ›

Co-op members will gather at three trustee district meetings Jan. 29-Feb. 1 to select candidates for the co-op’s board of trustees in Districts 3, 5 and 7. Incumbents in the... Continue Reading ›

Winter Storm Grayson made its presence known by bringing rain, freezing rain and ice into Clay Electric’s service area Wednesday morning, particularly in areas served by the Lake... Continue Reading ›

A business owner served by Clay Electric in the Orange Park area called to report that he received a phone call from someone who claimed the owner had not paid his August electric... Continue Reading ›

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What are the reasons for tree pruning and clearing?

The two most important reasons for tree pruning and keeping clear rights-of-way are member safety and service reliability. Trees must be pruned to prevent contact between power lines and tree limbs to reduce the constant threat of causing tree related power outages. “Climbable” trees near power lines are a safety hazard and must also be removed or pruned on a regular basis to prevent children from climbing the trees and coming in contact with the conductors. Limbs over hanging power lines must be pruned because of the threat of falling on the power lines during inclement weather and cause extensive outages and damage. Trees that grow too close to power lines can sway during inclement weather, such as thunder storms or high winds and touch the power lines. This gives electricity a path to the ground (which it is always seeking) causing a potentially serious fire and safety hazard along with power outages.