Clay Electric personnel continues efforts Wednesday evening, July 7, to restore service to members who were impacted by Tropical Storm Elsa. As of 8 p.m., 1,836 members remained... Continue Reading ›

Clay Electric Cooperative is grieving for a lost friend and co-worker. Lineworker William “Ziggy” Ziegenfelder, 56, passed away while working in the co-op's Gainesville service... Continue Reading ›

Vehicles from our fleet are currently up for auction online and more will be available in the coming weeks. Three auctions will take place; two will feature small fleet vehicles... Continue Reading ›

A forecast team from Colorado State University has predicted an above-average level of activity in the Atlantic basin this hurricane season. The CSU Tropical Meteorology... Continue Reading ›

The 83rd Annual Meeting video report is now available. You’ll hear remarks from the president of the Board of Trustees, Susan Reeves; General Manager Ricky Davis' report; and the... Continue Reading ›

Due to ongoing concerns surrounding the spread of coronavirus, the co-op has made the difficult decision to cancel the gathering portion of Annual Meeting for the second year in a... Continue Reading ›

What is Clay Electric's procedure for restoring power?

Restoring power after widespread outages is a big job that involves more than simply throwing a switch or removing a tree from a line. It involves a huge coordination effort with hundreds of linemen working in very dangerous situations. There is nothing routine when restoring power after a storm.

Although Clay Electric is committed to restoring the electric power to all co-op accounts as safely and quickly as possible, our initial goal is to safely restore power to the greatest number of members in the shortest time possible. In order to accomplish that, the process begins with a damage assessment of the co-op's lines and facilities by employees who have been specifically trained to accomplish those tasks. The assessment allows the co-op to direct its resources (both labor and materials) to the areas where they are needed the most.

Repairs are first made to the co-op's large transmission lines, which carry high-voltage electricity to our distribution system from generation stations like Seminole Electric Cooperative's coal-fired plant near Palatka. Lines such as these must be repaired first, along with any damage to transmission substations. Transmission lines serve many thousands of accounts.

Next in the process of restoration of power are the distribution substations and their respective main feeder lines. The co-op has more than 50 substations on its system, and there are more than 12,000 miles of distribution lines which are routed from the substations. Main feeder lines are those you normally see alongside a highway.

The number of members served by Clay Electric's distribution substations range from a few hundred to nearly 9,000 members, so you can see the importance of getting the substations back in service. A main feeder line on Clay Electric's system serves as many as 2,300 members.

Individual tap lines are repaired next in the restoration process. Tap lines typically serve the fewest number of members.